Prairie weather: Your 2017 growing season outlook

Drew Lerner, Senior Agricultural Meteorologist, shares how weather will impact Saskatchewan and Alberta in the 2017 growing season.

Video Highlights

  • 2017 started off lousy with excessive rain and dry spots in Prairies
  • September (especially in Alberta) expected to see frost
  • Take advantage of forward contracting to lock in best prices
  • Stay positive because weather can change
  • Take advantage of the dry weather when it happens

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