Expert advice on accessing export opportunities for pulses

Expert advice on accessing export opportunities for pulses

Highlights

  • Exports of oilseeds and pulses will continue to perform well
  • Demand for pulses is growing in all geographies, led by population growth in emerging markets
  • Advice includes knowing your buyers and their financial strength to ensure you are paid for your deliveries

Export Development Canada predicts exports of oilseeds and pulses will continue to perform well. Murad Al-Katib, CEO of AGT Food and Ingredients Inc. in Saskatchewan, agrees.

“I think we can be confident that you will see more pulses in everyday foods as a food ingredient and that the Canadian pulse industry continues to have growth potential ahead in the next decade,” says Al-Katib.

Growth market

Currently exported to over 130 countries in the world, Canada’s pulses primarily head to India, China and Turkey but, Al-Katib says, the demand for pulses is growing in all geographies, led by population growth in emerging markets.

We can be confident that you will see more pulses in everyday foods as a food ingredient.

Other reasons for growth include a growing demand for protein sources from consumers and for more pulses as an ingredient from the processed food industry. And, 2016’s designation as International Year of Pulses should also increase as it helps build global awareness of pulses and their nutritional benefits.

Al-Katib, who has been honoured for his commitment to food security and business leadership (Edwards School of Business selected him as its Grandey Leadership Honouree and the United Nations Association in Canada recently named him its 70th Anniversary Global Citizen Laureate), says Canadian pulse growers will benefit from the opportunity to transform Canada into a major global supplier of vegetable protein.

Exporting advice

EDC is one resource for those interested in exporting pulses to international markets. Sonia Vieira, a sector advisor with EDC, offers the following advice:

  • Manage your international risks by protecting your accounts receivables against losses due to a buyer’s inability to pay
  • Leverage foreign buyers who are setting up a presence in Canada looking to source Canadian pulses for direct export
  • Leverage the Trade Commissioner Service and associated federal and provincial services that provide assistance with exporting and market development
  • Be aware of corporate social responsibility risks when dealing with new buyers
  • Be aware of countries that have local regulations that could restrict international trade

Al-Katib offers his own advice:

  • Know buyers and their financial strength to ensure you are paid for your deliveries
  • Embrace new varieties, use new technologies and respect sound and sustainable farming practices to safeguard the quality of the products you grow for international markets
  • Support grower associations in pulses

An award-winning journalist, Trudy Kelly Forsythe operates Cultivating Communications, a communications company serving the agriculture industry, from her home in New Brunswick. Contact her at trudy@cultivatingcommunications.com